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gafsketchbook:

This is why i think Avatar should be R rated 

whiskeydrinking-operating:

This is Chester. When I was in Afghanistan I got a care package from one of those “Adopt a Soldier” programs that lets families send care packages to service men and women who are deployed overseas. Anyway, I got this care package, and it came with the usual stuff: Baby wipes, crackers, peanut butter, the Dad threw in a pack of cigarettes, and there was some jerky. But there was also a little beanie baby gold fish and a hand written note from a 7 year old girl that said  “Dear Soldier, (I wasn’t even mad) I hope you are doing well. I’m sorry you have to miss thanksgiving with your family. This is my friend Chester. He keeps me safe from monsters, but I think you need him more than I do. I hope he keeps you safe from the monsters you’re fighting. Take good care of him for me”.
You bet your ass that little fish was in my pocket every time I went on patrol.

whiskeydrinking-operating:

This is Chester. When I was in Afghanistan I got a care package from one of those “Adopt a Soldier” programs that lets families send care packages to service men and women who are deployed overseas. Anyway, I got this care package, and it came with the usual stuff: Baby wipes, crackers, peanut butter, the Dad threw in a pack of cigarettes, and there was some jerky. But there was also a little beanie baby gold fish and a hand written note from a 7 year old girl that said
“Dear Soldier, (I wasn’t even mad)
I hope you are doing well. I’m sorry you have to miss thanksgiving with your family. This is my friend Chester. He keeps me safe from monsters, but I think you need him more than I do. I hope he keeps you safe from the monsters you’re fighting. Take good care of him for me”.

You bet your ass that little fish was in my pocket every time I went on patrol.

hislittleflower-throughconcrete:

carpeumbra:

hislittleflower-throughconcrete:

zimmyix:

carpeumbra:

Fuck’s sake people.

Indian and Chinese Catholics exist.

They do yoga.

US Catholicism is not the center of the universe, nor Catholicism.

Catholicism, as much as it…

bloombergphotos:

Slum Redevelopment In Mumbai                           

Bloomberg photographer Dhiraj Singh documented Omkar Realtors & Developers Pvt.’s slum redevelopment at the company’s Cresent Bay project in the Paral area of Mumbai. He photographed the surrounding slum and ongoing construction, and paid a visit to the Pingle family, former slum dwellers and 
now residents in a finished Omkar housing block.

Omkar is playing an important role in Mumbai’s plan to do something about its enormous and embarrassing problem: at least 6.5 million slum dwellers, still living without running water, private toilets or the basics of sanitation.

When finished, Cresent Bay will have six luxury towers with million-dollar apartments overlooking the Arabian Sea, coupled with free housing nearby for all the slum dwellers with rights to the land. Omkar currently have 12 projects under way having completed 12 slum redevelopments with 40,000 residents rehoused so far.

“I may have married into a slum, but my daughter won’t go back to one,” Mrs Pingle said. “She will only go forward.” 

Read the Bloomberg News story by Bhuma Shrivastava and Sheridan Prasso.

Photographer: Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg

© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP 

sciencesoup:


A Sound Heard Round the World
In 1883 just off the coast of Jakarta, a volcano on the tiny island of Krakatoa exploded. It had been building up for months, and on the morning of August 27th, the volcano erupted for the fourth time, blowing apart the entire island. It spewed out over twenty five cubic kilometres of ash, pumice, and rock, created tsunami waves over thirty metres high, and overall caused over 36,000 deaths. The eruption caused a shockwave of energy to tear around the globe seven times, and it was measured by barometers for a full five days afterwards. This peak explosion was about thirteen times larger than the Hiroshima bomb, and the sound it made was literally heard around the world: people heard it clearly as far flung as Perth, 3500 kilometres away in Australia, and even 5000 kilometres away, police officials mistook the eruption for “the distant roar of heavy guns.” The sound is estimated to have been around 180 decibels—as loud as a rifle shot at point blank range, and loud enough to instantly kill all hearing tissue in the human ear. It’s believed that Krakatoa’s eruption was one of the loudest sounds ever generated on Earth, rivalled only by the eruption of Mount Tambora in 1815, and the Tunguska event of 1908, when a meteroid or comet fragment exploded in the air above Russia. No wonder Krakatoa is considered the most dangerous volcano in human history.

sciencesoup:

A Sound Heard Round the World

In 1883 just off the coast of Jakarta, a volcano on the tiny island of Krakatoa exploded. It had been building up for months, and on the morning of August 27th, the volcano erupted for the fourth time, blowing apart the entire island. It spewed out over twenty five cubic kilometres of ash, pumice, and rock, created tsunami waves over thirty metres high, and overall caused over 36,000 deaths. The eruption caused a shockwave of energy to tear around the globe seven times, and it was measured by barometers for a full five days afterwards. This peak explosion was about thirteen times larger than the Hiroshima bomb, and the sound it made was literally heard around the world: people heard it clearly as far flung as Perth, 3500 kilometres away in Australia, and even 5000 kilometres away, police officials mistook the eruption for “the distant roar of heavy guns.” The sound is estimated to have been around 180 decibels—as loud as a rifle shot at point blank range, and loud enough to instantly kill all hearing tissue in the human ear. It’s believed that Krakatoa’s eruption was one of the loudest sounds ever generated on Earth, rivalled only by the eruption of Mount Tambora in 1815, and the Tunguska event of 1908, when a meteroid or comet fragment exploded in the air above Russia. No wonder Krakatoa is considered the most dangerous volcano in human history.

thepostmodernpottercompendium:

There are two wars.
Gittel is at Durmstrang when she hears. She’s in the corridor by the potion laboratories with Rozalija and Audra—the only other Lithuanian girls in her class—when her owl comes through the window and lands on her shoulder.
“Someone’s writing from home,” she tells them, unfolding the letter. “My brother, Elizer. He says—he says there are Germans in Šeduva, that they’re rounding up the Jewish families, forcing them to work—”
“Good,” Rozalija says. “My mother says the Jews are rotten. All they do is steal from us. It’s about time someone imposed some laws on them.”
“I am Jewish,” Gittel says, trying to keep her voice calm. “Or did you forget? When have I ever stolen from you?”
“Not you, specifically,” Audra says, a little embarrassed. “Your people.”
You must come home, Eliezer writes, you must use your magic to help us.
I have to stay at school, Gittel writes back.
There are two wars.
There are whispers in the corridors about Grindelwald and his followers torturing wix from non-magical families, and Gittel thinks of the look on her father’s face when an owl came to their window with a letter tied to its leg.
A boy grabs her arm as he walks past her, hisses in her ear. “Your blood is filthy.” Lets her go, pushes her against the wall.
She wonders how he knows. Maybe she is wearing her surprise on her sleeve, a star that lights up every time something magical turns her eye, every time something happens that she never knew was possible.
There’s a symbol scratched into the wall, a triangle with a circle inside it and a line through it. Gittel wonders why people need a picture for their cause.
There are two wars.
Another letter comes from Eliezer, his handwriting sprawled and urgent. Gittel has to squint to read it—she’s lost a little bit of her Yiddish with every year she spends away from home. He writes that in other towns, they’ve started herding the Jews out of the ghettos in trucks.
He does not know where they are taking them. He fears that Šeduva will be next.
Come home, Gittel.
Another boy grabs her arm in the corridor, but this one does not push her aside. He slips a piece of parchment in her pocket without a word. She doesn’t read it until she’s alone in her dormitory.
Δ ○ |Resist
“I cannot,” she tells herself. Her education is more important than fighting in a war.
There are two wars.
It’s a Friday morning when the school is called to assembly in the courtyard by the front gates. “What do you suppose is so important that we had to leave our hex class?” Rozalija asks.
The Headmaster conjures a platform and raises himself above the crowd. “A school ought not take sides in a war,” he says. “But we can no longer allow Muggle-born students to attend our school.”
They are told that they have a week to gather their belongings and make their way home. There is nothing more for them at Durmstrang.
“It was only a matter of time,” Audra says.
“Perhaps it will be better this way,” Rozalija says.
There are two wars.
The day before Gittel is due to leave Durmstrang and return home, one of the boys in the courtyard is reading a Muggle newspaper.
“Where did you get that?” Gittel asks him.
“I’m not telling you, mudblood,” he says.
She hides behind a tree as he reads it aloud to his friends.
“… and they have taken all the Jews in Šiauliai…”
Her home county. It seems too easy, too sudden, but now Gittel has no home to return to.
There are two wars.
“We’ll miss you!” Audra says. “Do you think we’ll see you again?”
“I don’t think so,” Gittel says. She doesn’t think they’ll miss her, either.
She takes a train away from Durmstrang with the other Muggle-born students. There are first years there, crying in fear, and older students holding their hands and telling them that everything will be alright.
The train pulls into its destination and the former students flood out, looking for their families. Gittel has not heard from Eliezer in weeks.
There are two wars, but both wars are fought over the false worship of one blood over another. Both wars are forcing Gittel from her home, and she wants to fight in both. But she finds the newspapers at the station, she reads the headlines, and she loses hope that she’ll ever see her family again. She still has magic, though. She still has her wand, and there’s one war that still needs fighters.
There are tears in her eyes, but there is still a piece of parchment in her pocket. Resist.
She sees the boy who gave it to her leaving the station and she runs after him.
“Wait!”
(submitted by memordes. This piece is a poignant and touching look at how these two wars - magical and muggle - could have intersected.)

thepostmodernpottercompendium:

There are two wars.

Gittel is at Durmstrang when she hears. She’s in the corridor by the potion laboratories with Rozalija and Audra—the only other Lithuanian girls in her class—when her owl comes through the window and lands on her shoulder.

“Someone’s writing from home,” she tells them, unfolding the letter. “My brother, Elizer. He says—he says there are Germans in Šeduva, that they’re rounding up the Jewish families, forcing them to work—”

“Good,” Rozalija says. “My mother says the Jews are rotten. All they do is steal from us. It’s about time someone imposed some laws on them.”

“I am Jewish,” Gittel says, trying to keep her voice calm. “Or did you forget? When have I ever stolen from you?”

“Not you, specifically,” Audra says, a little embarrassed. “Your people.”

You must come home, Eliezer writes, you must use your magic to help us.

I have to stay at school, Gittel writes back.

There are two wars.

There are whispers in the corridors about Grindelwald and his followers torturing wix from non-magical families, and Gittel thinks of the look on her father’s face when an owl came to their window with a letter tied to its leg.

A boy grabs her arm as he walks past her, hisses in her ear. “Your blood is filthy.” Lets her go, pushes her against the wall.

She wonders how he knows. Maybe she is wearing her surprise on her sleeve, a star that lights up every time something magical turns her eye, every time something happens that she never knew was possible.

There’s a symbol scratched into the wall, a triangle with a circle inside it and a line through it. Gittel wonders why people need a picture for their cause.

There are two wars.

Another letter comes from Eliezer, his handwriting sprawled and urgent. Gittel has to squint to read it—she’s lost a little bit of her Yiddish with every year she spends away from home. He writes that in other towns, they’ve started herding the Jews out of the ghettos in trucks.

He does not know where they are taking them. He fears that Šeduva will be next.

Come home, Gittel.

Another boy grabs her arm in the corridor, but this one does not push her aside. He slips a piece of parchment in her pocket without a word. She doesn’t read it until she’s alone in her dormitory.

Δ ○ |
Resist

“I cannot,” she tells herself. Her education is more important than fighting in a war.

There are two wars.

It’s a Friday morning when the school is called to assembly in the courtyard by the front gates. “What do you suppose is so important that we had to leave our hex class?” Rozalija asks.

The Headmaster conjures a platform and raises himself above the crowd. “A school ought not take sides in a war,” he says. “But we can no longer allow Muggle-born students to attend our school.”

They are told that they have a week to gather their belongings and make their way home. There is nothing more for them at Durmstrang.

“It was only a matter of time,” Audra says.

“Perhaps it will be better this way,” Rozalija says.

There are two wars.

The day before Gittel is due to leave Durmstrang and return home, one of the boys in the courtyard is reading a Muggle newspaper.

“Where did you get that?” Gittel asks him.

“I’m not telling you, mudblood,” he says.

She hides behind a tree as he reads it aloud to his friends.

“… and they have taken all the Jews in Šiauliai…”

Her home county. It seems too easy, too sudden, but now Gittel has no home to return to.

There are two wars.

“We’ll miss you!” Audra says. “Do you think we’ll see you again?”

“I don’t think so,” Gittel says. She doesn’t think they’ll miss her, either.

She takes a train away from Durmstrang with the other Muggle-born students. There are first years there, crying in fear, and older students holding their hands and telling them that everything will be alright.

The train pulls into its destination and the former students flood out, looking for their families. Gittel has not heard from Eliezer in weeks.

There are two wars, but both wars are fought over the false worship of one blood over another. Both wars are forcing Gittel from her home, and she wants to fight in both. But she finds the newspapers at the station, she reads the headlines, and she loses hope that she’ll ever see her family again. She still has magic, though. She still has her wand, and there’s one war that still needs fighters.

There are tears in her eyes, but there is still a piece of parchment in her pocket. Resist.

She sees the boy who gave it to her leaving the station and she runs after him.

“Wait!”

(submitted by memordes. This piece is a poignant and touching look at how these two wars - magical and muggle - could have intersected.)

maddmullah:

Mariah Carey vs Ariana Grande

sketchinetch:

cremebuns:

emeralddragoness:

cremebuns:

A man just walked past me and said “excuse me, but you look very nice tonight darlin” I said thank you and he said you’re welcome and walked off. And that is how you compliment a woman without harassing them

No, that is still unsolicited, and thus, harassment. No amount of “darlins” is gonna make me not want to punch your ass for coming on to me without provocation.

GOD

SHUT UP

UR SO STUPID

image

[x]

disneymoviesandfacts:

A number of non-singers make their singing debuts in Enchanted, including Patrick Dempsey. The only main character who does not sing is Nancy, played by actress Idina Menzel - who has two Tony award nominations and one win for Broadway musical singing roles. In an interview, Menzel stated she felt flattered to be hired solely as an actress.

disneymoviesandfacts:

A number of non-singers make their singing debuts in Enchanted, including Patrick Dempsey. The only main character who does not sing is Nancy, played by actress Idina Menzel - who has two Tony award nominations and one win for Broadway musical singing roles. In an interview, Menzel stated she felt flattered to be hired solely as an actress.

scienceyoucanlove:

inmytsinelas:

Oops, I made a thing.

this website

scienceyoucanlove:

inmytsinelas:

Oops, I made a thing.

this website

hernamewastangerine:

frenchtoastandpancakes:

My daughter has chosen the Dark Side

I’m crying.

Every time I encounter this video, I hit replay so many times it’s ridiculous.

Love Is An Open Door 8 Bit
Alex Long
40,833 plays

lost-in-my-echoes:

We meet again! Here is another 8 Bit Frozen Reversioning! Let me know if there are songs you would like me to make 8 bit, and I will do my best!

SUPER AMAZING PIXEL ARTIST

Downloads 

This

First Time In Forever (Reprise)

Let It Go

Life’s Too Short

Next up on the list, who knows. We’ll see if tomorrow is when something new will begin ;-) 

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